I am interested in the suitability of IMSMO in a < 10 user test environment in which the Notes client as well as the Outlook client will be used to manage Mail, Calendar and Tasks in a Mail file on the Domino Server.  

I would like to connect with someone in the Yellowverse who has successfully deployed IMSMO. I need to test something and would value talking with a fellow peer, IBM Champion or IBM business partner.

I'd like to better understand the opportunities and caveats from those who have gone before.

I welcome your comments and feedback based on your experience.

Thanks.

Eric

I have a question to ask and a tip to share

Background
I want to move some information contained in an IBM Lotus Notes Notebook (notebook.nsf or journal.nsf) into a Microsoft OneNote file. The documents in my Notebook.nsf contain rich text, attachments and embedded objects -- all of which I would like to preserve in OneNote.

The Notes to Office 365/Outlook migration tools I've found migrate mail/calendar/contacts and some do tasks, but none so far migrate notebook.nsf which is separate from my Notes mail file.

Question
Are you aware of a tool or method to migrate documents from a Lotus Notes Notebook into OneNote other than using "print to OneNote" or Copy/paste for each document?

I would appreciate any tips or recommendations you can share.

Tip
You may be able to convert documents in your Notebook.nsf into emails in the mail file. I recently helped a client who was migrating from Notes to Outlook accomplish this. The client had several eProductivity Reference Databases (essentially a GTD enabled notebook.nsf) to convert. I worked with a colleague to create a program to migrate documents from that file into the user's Lotus Notes Mail file as email messages. Our program did all of the conversion, making it a one click operation. When done, the client had a single email in his mail file for each source document in his notebook.nsf. This allowed him to migrate his emails and his Notebook.nsf documents into Outlook (all as emails). From there, the client will have to find a way to move his emails from Outlook into OneNote but I assume there is a path for that.

If you can help with the question above, I would appreciate it.

eProductivity V4

Tuesday, February 23rd, 2016
After 10 years of development, eProductivity has proven to be a stable product; however, there's always room for improvement and the occasional fixes. :-)

This release of eProductivity includes many new features to facilitate working with archives as well as various new productivity features.

Here are a few highlights; for more details, see here.

Productivity Features Added
  • To speed up filing emails, the 'Send & File' and 'Move to Folder' menus now display the last three folders you filed into (even if they are in another mail file or archive).

Archiving Features Added

These were created to make archiving easier, especially for users whose organizations use automatic archiving. These will help you better manage your information and protect your active work from being archived without your knowledge:
  • The Archiving view has been updated to make it even easier for you to see and archive completed items while protecting incomplete items.
  • Easily archive and restore folders: New buttons in folders in Mail and Archives will allow you to:
    MOVE
    the current folder (including subfolders) to an archive.
    RESTORE
    a folder (including subfolders) from an archive back to the Mail file.

I use these feature daily to manage my mail file, by pruning inactive folders full of emails to my archive, yet knowing that if I ever want to restore that folder from my archive I can do so with a single click. This keeps Domino Administrators happy as users have small mail files, yet it keeps users happy because they can find with they want and have it where they want it. The eProductivity Global Search tool also makes it easy to find messages, regardless of whether they are in the mail, archive or an external mail file.

New features in eProductivity Reference

The latest version of eProductivity Reference has added two new features:
  • The Timestamp feature makes it easy to timestamp any entry in the Reference DB. This is similar to the timestamp function in journal entries, but the new Timestamp can be applied to any document in the Reference DB.
eProductivity is free for use on archive files and reference (Notebooks). A free essentials version is also available. Details

Domino Server on Raspberry Pi

Saturday, October 3rd, 2015
I have a Domino server which I've kept on the shelf for the past 10 years because it runs a legacy application that I use occasionally. It's been running just fine -- nonstop -- for more than a decade. It doesn't need much processing power nor does it need much disk space. I've thought about how I might preserve it and keep it running and I have considered using either a VM or a mini ATX server.

Last year, Hackaday, one of my favorite hacking sites, had an article on how to load a limited version of Linux on a Linksys Router. That got me thinking that it would be cool to have a Domino server inside of a Linux router sitting on my bookshelf.

That reminded me of a post by Daniel Nashed about running Domino an on Xbox.
Small computers have come a long way since then, so I've been thinking about what it would take to run a Domino server on a Raspberry Pi.

Why would I want to do that? 1) Because it just well may be possible, and 2) to allow a seldom used dedicated Domino server app to continue its life in a low power machine.

A quick Google search did not turn up anything but I'm sure someone much smarter than me has had this same idea.

It's possible to mount a USB hard drive on a Raspberry Pi and even SD cards have plenty of storage so that shouldn't be an issue.

I found this blog that documents how to install Lotus Domino 8.5 on Ubuntu which may be helpful (or not).

I'm not a Linux guy, but I did manage to set up Ubuntu once on an old ThinkPad. I'm not afraid of learning something new, though. No idea if I will build this but I might try, just to see what can be done. (If you have links to share, either on getting started with Linux or working with Domino on Linux, please share in the comments.)

So, I post this idea to the YellowVerse to see what conversation or links it may generate.

Coaching my clients to new levels of workplace performance is my favorite thing about what I do. Sometimes it's hard, but hearing what they say afterward makes it all worth it:

Clearly, I wasn't working as efficiently as I could have.  Now, I'm creating greater results, with less effort

I had no idea such basic shifts in the way that I think about my work and how I use my tools could have such a profound impact on my performance, and my life. Thank you!

The last time my inbox was this empty was 5 years ago -- on my first day of work as CTO

I feel so much better about my work.

Sometimes, though, I run into something puzzling. After coaching a busy executive and hearing them express (over several weeks) the immense relief it's brought them, I'll bring up the subject of training the rest of their team.

Sometimes, they'll hesitate, then say, "I'm not sure they need this as much as I do . . ."

This used to stump me. I've seen my client's teams, and usually they're just as overwhelmed as the executives they answer to. My clients have gotten clear, lasting relief, so bringing the same to their team seems like a no-brainer to me. Wouldn't it be wonderful if everyone were so effective? Why not train the rest of the team?

Building people instead of buying them

Here's my philosophy on coaching: when I hire someone, I want to get their full value. To do that, they have to grow; to grow, they have to be fed.

That's why it boggles my mind when companies invest in the latest systems and tools for their employees, then refuse to invest in training them. The team is left to flail about and figure it out for themselves, always struggling just to survive in their job: overwhelmed, over-stressed, overwrought, and overboard.

As an employer, I don't want my people working that way. I want them to be effective, confident, executive, and efficient. Of course, I could simply hire someone with all the skills I want, but those tend to be very rare and very expensive; besides, they may still be unfamiliar with my tools and processes.

Honestly, I'd rather build my people.

One employee, then and now

A few years ago, I hired an intern, a recent college graduate new to the workplace. When I hired him, he knew relatively little about effective self-management and knowledge work. Most of his experience had been with someone else telling him what to do and how. He wasn't a "knowledge worker."

Now, though, he is an executive: maybe not yet in title, but in what he's capable of achieving.

He didn't get there by osmosis. I've trained him myself over time.

I could have spent my time on other activities. I could have let him sit with his current skill set and simply answer emails and do clerk-work. I could have been content to not get the full value of his potential—but I wasn't.

I chose to unleash his potential, for his benefit and mine, by investing in and training him.

Has it been worth it? I'd certainly say so.

This isn't my first time, either: I've repeated this many times, with many people over the past 30 years, and gotten tremendous value as a result.

Get the value

Maybe that's an extreme example, but it illustrates the point. You hire someone to create value for you. Even if they come in with skills, at the minimum they need to learn how to work with you and your organization to create value.

"Value" can be measured in a number of ways:
- How quickly you get things done
- How much of your effort is directed towards the right things to do
- How confident and focused you are at work
- The speed and precision of your decisions
- Your ability to quickly process inputs and recalibrate

The job of you and your team, together, is to create value (all of the above and more) for the organization. So the question again is: what if you grew value in them?

But what if you lose them?

A senior manager once told Zig Ziglar that he didn't want to waste money training his people only to have them leave. Zig's response was, "The only thing worse than training someone and losing them, is not training them and keeping them."

I take the same view. You can train your people and make them more effective, confident, executive, and efficient . . . or, you can simply stay at your current accomplishment level. Think about it.

There's more to the story of the young intern I hired. I knew from the start that our time together was limited—a year or two, at best. So why would I invest so much in him?

Again, because I wanted to build value in him, for as long as I have him. I know it's been better for him and me.

The bottom line

The bottom line is that coaching and training work, and my clients and I have seen it work hundreds of times. This includes training I've given, received, and seen others give and receive. Some of my clients have even gone out of their way to measure how well it works (ask me for the impact report from PUMA).

I've seen people become more confident, relaxed, de-stressed, in-control, effective, and efficient after only a few hours of training. I've even come back to those people weeks or months later and found they're still working effectively. In most cases, they've even built on what they've learned and moved beyond it!

I've had the privilege of working with some forward-thinking managers and executives who've chosen to invest in their people. Because of that, they and their teams have gotten far more value out of their work. Most of them aren't using any more time or energy than they were before, but they're still getting much more done and much more effectively.

The client's decision . . .

To me, the decision to train people and build their value is unmistakably clear. It was clear for my client as well: once he saw the value, he decided to extend the training to other members of his team, and greatly appreciated the benefit of it.

. . . and yours

So will you be the manager that doesn't invest in training their people, leaving them to work with their current skills until they leave you?—Or, will you invest in them and get the value of their full potential for as long as they stay? The choice is yours.

When you're ready to invest in your people and get greater value in return, give me a call. I can help.